Posts Tagged ‘make-up’

Double take dupes

Monday, July 5th, 2010

Speaking of fast fashion, I was at our local Fred Meyer the other day an noticed a valiant effort by drugstore polish Sinful Colors to imitate the higher end OPI’s (horribly named, as usual) Spring 2010 “Hong Kong” collection:

Fast fashion in nail colour

I haven’t seen anything about this “Shanghai Collection” online, but I know for a fact that some of the colours in the display, like Ruby Ruby, existed before they decided to ride any coattails.  Overall, it doesn’t feel like they’re trying to completely copy OPI and are just attempting to package the same “feel” or “inspiration”.  Which, yes, totes copying, good for them.  I don’t like OPI’s application or price point, but I do love me some Sinful Colors.

When the first previews of the Hong Kong collection came out, All Lacquered Up showed a couple dupe possibilities, but found that there weren’t any good non-OPI options that carried the same colour qualities as this collection.  Though most of Sinful Colors Shanghai Nights is made up of their standard colours, there are some definite dupes, or attempts at them.

OPI v. Sinful Colors, 1
Sinful Colors: Rise and Shine (more turquoise)
OPI: Jade Is The New Black (more green)

OPI v. Sinful Colors, 2
Sinful Colors: Thimbleberry (slightly more coral)
OPI: Red My Fortune Cookie (more orangey)

The best dupe I went ahead and bought.  And now I have two bottles of exactly the same colour.

OPI v. Sinful Colors, 3

Sinful Colors: Big Daddy
OPI: A Good Mandarin Is Hard To Find

Under some indoor light, OPI’s shade is the barest touch more blue-red.  And Sinful Colors’ shade looked much thinner and orangey at one coat.  But after two coats they are essentially identical.  Same opacity, same colour.

Which, I am super into my nails and had to think, “does this fit what I am going for with this dumb blog?” And, I think maybe?

The search for good dupes in the nail world is interesting, because it is totally accepted. Why pay upwards of nine dollars for a bottle of polish when you can get pretty much the same thing for a dollar-fifty?  But copying a shoe or piece of clothing is a clear not cool (or is acknowledged as uncool while you are also like “Thank fucking goodness, I am not paying multiple hundreds for that”).  There are clear intellectual property issues with fashion design that do not apply for colours.  Because they’re, y’know, colours—though what goes into creating a colour, and dye vats and formulas are a clear proprietary thing.  But the science is not what you see, just the colours.

Nail polish, like other accessories (and I class it as an accessory, not makeup, because there is more freedom in how it can be used) is something that becomes more popular when folks aren’t as willing to spend money on clothes.  And those cycles fascinate me.

Something different: The Beauty Routine

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

There is a lot of nail stuff.

In the shower I use first a water-activated gel cleanser, then a honey-almond body scrub, and on the face an exfoliating gel scrub.  Vidal Sassoon shampoo is especially good at getting rid of the coating of dried perspiration, salts, oils airborne pollutants and dirt that can weigh down hair and flatten it to the scalp which can make you look older. . . . If the face seems dry and flaky—which makes it look dull and older—use a clarifying lotion that removes flakes and uncovers skin (it can also make your tan look darker).  Then apply an anti-aging eye balm (Baume Des Yeux) followed by a final mosturizing “protective” lotion.

Ellis, Brett Eason.   American Psycho.  New York:  Vintage Contemporaries, 1991.

I recently tore through the archives of Beauty Schooled and loved a series of posts Virginia wrote on her beauty routine.  I mentioned lady-drag in my VS bra review, and I’ll examine it further later—relevant here, over the past couple of years I’ve taken on more aspects of the femme beauty routine while trying to maintain simplicity and a low-key process.  I have a very complicated relationship with The Beauty Routine, but I’m lucky enough to be comfortable with what is probably more on the minimum end of the spectrum, especially for someone with curly hair.  Anyway, Beauty Schooled says it best:

I’m realizing that we need to talk more about all the different kinds of beauty work we perform and all the different ways we value it. Because sometimes we’re ambivalent about sharing these details. It’s hard to admit you have lip hair, or you need to apply deodorant twice a day since these things don’t fit into the way we define pretty (hairless, sweet-smelling, etc).

So, this is pretty long and, frankly, kind of self-indulgent, so under the cut it goes.

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We are what we’re made of

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

I was one of several folks totally panting for the menswear in Alexander McQueen’s F2009 show.  And while the clothes are made of yes and form an interesting contrast to other things we’re seeing, it was the make-up that got my brain clicking.

photo: Marcio Madeira

The red ringing beneath the eyes, set off by that winter pallor?  Absolutely villainous and surprisingly a long standing part of my eye make-up rotation.  Also totally something that most people cover up and don’t do on purpose.

In Feburary’s W, there’s a short piece on Ellis Faas, with a quote that brought it all together for me.

“Why not take the purple in a bruise and use it as an eye colour?  It’s a very natural thing to do.”

Faas, a former special effects artist with lots of bruises and cuts under her belt, calls it “Human Colours“.  I think it’s, like, a beautiful circle (though it’s probably more of a hearkening to something quite different) that on the front page there’s an image with the same under-eye red seen on McQueen’s runway.

blood

Make-up traditionally covers up and/or distracts from that what you don’t want shown, emphasises that which you do.  In the expanding culture of coolness—where you can buy things that make it look like you spent time and pain under the tattooist’s needle or dedication in stretching your piercings—make-up like Shiner (one of the many soc-cultural gems in Spike’s Templar, Arizona) doesn’t seem too out of line.  We’re wanting to emphasise something different.

I know my paltry collection of colour, in bruised purples and blues, sallow yellows and lip tone nudes already align with the idea of “Human Colour”, despite my originally buying them for their brightness and darkness.  Now I just need to play with it more.  Nothing however, will tear me away from my red.

I really do love it